Challenges in specialist mechanical engineering

The requirements in specialist mechanical engineering are tough. But what exactly does that mean when it comes to quality and service?

Whether you’re talking about a lean production assembly cell, ergonomic assembly workstations or even a protective enclosure for a laser used to track space junk, week after week on the item blog, the stories and views of our interviewees all highlight the most important rule in specialist mechanical engineering – rigid concepts never get you where you want to be. Instead, what lies at the heart of this extraordinary and fascinating sector is creativity and a flexible approach to both design and execution. That in turn means that the components used in specialist mechanical engineering applications have to satisfy some very specific requirements. But what kind of problems do specialist mechanical engineers typically encounter in their day-to-day work? And how can they get around them?

Broader definition of quality and increased time pressure

These days, the concept of quality covers much more than just the resilience and durability of the materials used. In fact, it encompasses everything from the system as a whole to all the processes that are linked to it. Added to that is the growing importance of lean production principles – companies are working hard to avoid tying up capital unnecessarily. That means they aim to manufacture and hold in stock only as much as is strictly necessary. Or, to put it another way, they only start manufacturing something once an order has actually been placed. For that approach to work, both the product and the entire system behind it must be flexible and top quality. That even stretches as far as comprehensive customer support, and manufacturing companies should focus on elements such as one-to-one assistance, help with technical and design issues and rapid, reliable delivery.

Time is another key factor in specialist mechanical engineering. Of course, it goes without saying that time efficiency has always been incredibly important, whether in terms of project milestones or delivery deadlines. Nonetheless, manufacturing companies have since come under much greater pressure. In fact, time pressure is growing constantly, with companies in many sectors now having to routinely agree contractual penalties for significant delivery delays in order to secure orders. Customers are also becoming more demanding when it comes to flexibility. New requirements profiles are coming thick and fast, meaning that plants have to be reconfigured and modified increasingly often. One of the primary challenges in specialist mechanical engineering is helping customers to improve or redesign their production systems at ever-shorter intervals.

Maximum requirements for materials and customer service

We have always tackled these specialist mechanical engineering challenges by putting in place our own quality and service policies. There are numerous reasons why purchasing item components represents a sustainable investment in the future. This is ensured by meticulous and continuous quality management certified to ISO 9001:2015. Our solutions are extremely robust, durable and flexible and all products are put through intensive testing in prototype engineering. They also incorporate safety factors that are geared to the product and user. This flexibility goes above and beyond what is expected of a modular aluminium building kit system, with even the very first original components in the MB Building Kit System still in use and available for delivery. What’s more, these hardy originals are still 100% compatible with the very latest item product innovations – and the many more yet to come.

This kind of continuous availability and forward-looking approach are particularly important in specialist mechanical engineering, as is maintaining an unwavering focus on the customer. Our motto “Your ideas are worth it” really shows how much we value our customers. The sales and manufacturing centre we opened in the Piepersberg business park at the end of 2016 has further enhanced our customer service offerings. This is reflected in our promise to deliver in-stock goods within 24 hours to customers in Germany and customised components within 48 hours. Construction kits and ready-made turnkey solutions can be delivered within 14 days, depending on the scope of the project in question. Some 5,000 continuously available small parts, 1,500 metric tons of lengthy products and 120 panels – those are the key stats for the storage facility that ensures the availability of the item product range. We also do everything we can to make it easier for our customers to complete their projects. Whether one-to-one consulting and sample solutions, training courses or practical software for digital engineering, we’re always there to help.

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2018-07-26T07:36:14+00:00June 15th, 2018|Know-how|
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